Triumph Street Triple, test (characteristics and curiosities)
Triumph Street Triple, test (characteristics and curiosities)
Anonim

One of the most anticipated novelties in the naked tights segment has come to MotorpasiĆ³n Moto to show itself in all its splendor. The Triumph Street Triple hits the market completely renovated Beyond what its well-known shapes may lead you to believe, it hardly shares components with its predecessor and once again benefits from the investment that Triumph has made in the Daytona 675.

It is still a versatile and discreet motorcycle as Morrillu told us last year, but it highlights its strengths and goes a step further on how good it was. Now she adopts a much more modern image with less fussiness and emphasizes her strengths to try to shake her competitors. Will it succeed?

Triumph Street Triple: improving the present

Triumph_Street_Triple
Triumph_Street_Triple

I think that beyond certain personal details it is difficult to find people who would tell you, after having tried the Triuphm Street Triple, that they look like a bad motorcycle or they don't like it. When the first of its kind was born in the image and likeness of the mythical Speed Triple but with components inherited from the Daytona 675, Triumph put on the table a model that revolutionized the market for naked stockings with more than versatile aspirations.

After a discreet restyling in which only headlights and decorations were changed, it was time to thoroughly renew the model and, as we will see later, it goes beyond what we can think at first. If we put together a 2012 and a 2013 it is possible that under the gaze of a slightly restless eye they look like the same motorcycle but it is not like that, they share the name and few other things.

The current engine is limited to 95 horsepower to be used appropriately under the restrictions of the new A2 cardBut it benefits from the new technology incorporated into the generation of engines debuted at the Daytona.

Triumph Street Triple: discreet revolution

triumph_street_triple_2013
triumph_street_triple_2013

If we refine the view on the photo above we will find that there is more differences than may appear on the new Triumph Street Triple. In the first place, the change in the position of the exhaust is obvious, leaving the double exit raised under the tail to now place itself in the lower and right part of the motorcycle, following the general pattern of mass centralization and visually lightening the rear area. significantly. Now the tail is very slim with a long license plate holder that leaves the plate suspended beyond the rear wheel.

The aluminum chassis is brand new, almost identical to that of its sports family but without some reinforcements, narrower and with new anchors to also change the position of the engine and place it lower. In fact, almost everything is down, even the tank is almost flush with the upper triple clamp and loses volume compared to the old one. Not even the subframe nor the wheels have been reused, nor the swingarm, they are all new, also taking the first ones straight from the daytona and the second adopting very similar but not identical forms.

The subframe is a single piece of high-pressure die-cast aluminum to increase stiffness while keeping weight at bay, and the rims are made of five-spoke aluminum alloy that are lighter and nicer than the previous model.

Triumph_Street_Triple
Triumph_Street_Triple

The bodywork has been completely redesigned Except for the front fender, it does not have a rear as standard, but our unit mounted it as an optional accessory along with the chain guide and the tank protector. All the covers are of new invoice with a much more current and dynamic image fleeing from that certain retro aftertaste that its predecessor displayed. They combine quite well with the exhaust pipe with that bulky silencer with angular shapes, there are no stridencies in the whole and the truth is that the Triumph Street Triple wins a lot in person.

One of the few things that does not change are the characteristic family headlights, with that peculiar bulging look that has brought so much controversy since they abandoned round shapes for ones with more angles. The truth is that I don't dislike them at all, but they do seem a bit large to me, if they were slightly more contained or more stylized in size, I think they would look better, although they would renounce their current hallmark.

Triumph_Street_Triple
Triumph_Street_Triple

At the controls we find a board already known that combines an analog tachometer on the right that contains some indicators and a generous digital display on the left. The LCD screen will show us abundant information on which we can act with two buttons located on the right side of the screen.

Among the usual data such as the speedometer, partials, consumption, temperature and time clock, we also have a stopwatch, fuel gauge (very accurate and that reports variations at a low cost) and gear indicator engaged. To top it off, at the top of the tachometer we have a small strip of blue LEDs that will act as gear shift indicator, which is also configurable from the menu.

Triumph_Street_Triple
Triumph_Street_Triple

The control pineapples are the usual ones that the British have been using for their models, so we will not find surprises. The brake lever is adjustable in four positions, while the clutch lever (mechanically operated) is not.

The rest of the equipment consists of a inverted front fork with 41 millimeter diameter rods and a monoshock with connecting rods, both of the KYB brand. As for the brakes, we have in front of a double disc of 310 millimeters in diameter with Nissin pliers with two pistons and behind a single 220-millimeter disc with single-piston caliper. On this occasion they have wanted to emphasize from Triumph the differences in character and equipment between the normal version and the R, much better equipped both in brakes and suspensions as well as in the engine.

But let's not get into behavioral issues yet, that is coming tomorrow.

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