Seeley Norton MkII, reliving the past
Seeley Norton MkII, reliving the past
Anonim

This Seeley Norton MKII that you see in the photos has appeared in a chapter of Cafe Racer TV, a Discovery HD program that I think cannot be seen in our country. But perhaps the best thing is that this is not a real Seeley Norton MkII from the sixties, if not a current recreation of the original. Although this recreation has the approval of Colin Seeley, the designer of the original chassis, and it seems that this has been built as painstakingly as the Briton did in his day.

In the original article they comment Kenny Cummings and Dan Rose, the manufacturers, that the construction of this motorcycle has not been as easy as it seemed, since being a true competition motorcycle everything has to be done with great care and preparation, since the slightest failure can be fatal. The chassis, for example, was built by Roger titschmarsh in the United Kingdom. The chassis is an exact replica of those that Seeley made in the sixties and with which some pilots like Mike Hailwood or Barry Sheene they won races. As a curious note the complete chassis only weighs 10.9 kg.

Seeley Norton MKII

The engine, a Norton Combat 750cc, has been rebuilt by Steve Maney with JS Motorsport components. High-quality and current components, which for example make one of the modern pistons weigh almost a third of the original one. All this is used to get 70 hp, which surely more than one may seem few, but we must remember that we are talking about a motorcycle with a design from sixty years ago and that weighs only 136 kg in running order. In addition, in your environment with those 70 hp you can be very high in the classification of a classics race.

Below you can see a video of the Seeley Norton MKII competing with a Moto Guzzi V1000 at Virginia International Raceway last August as a demonstration of the potential of such a bike. Pay attention because the video tells us what we see and how the Seeley driver has an ace up his sleeve.

Seeing this comes to mind a conversation that I have had several times with my friend Juan González who always asks me How much would it cost and how profitable would it be to re-manufacture classic motorcycles with current materials and technology?. The answer is still in the air, but you see that there are those who have anticipated our idea.

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